Bighorn Scenic Byway, Wyoming

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About Bighorn Scenic Byway:

Bighorn Scenic Byway follows US-14 beginning in Shell and moving through Shell Canyon into Bighorn National Forest. The road winds up the Big Horn Mountains, showcasing craggy limestone outcroppings, colorful stacks of granite, and sandstone filled with fossil shells. Take a drive and explore Bighorn National Forest, stop and see Shell Falls, then end your drive with a relaxing picnic at Connor Battlefield State Historic Site.

Bighorn National Forest covers over 1.1 million acres in northcentral Wyoming where a mild climate will keep you cool as you explore forests filled with fir, pine, spruce, and aspen trees. Here, all motorized or mechanical vehicles are prohibited, and wholesome recreation is the pleasant alternative. Camping, biking, and hiking are popular activities; 32 campgrounds and over 1,500 miles of trails accommodate many visitors each year. Go fishing at one of the many lakes loaded with trout and hundreds of other species of fish. Also, watch wildlife and see black bears, elk, moose, deer, and more.

Shell Falls, halfway into Shell Canyon, tumbles into Shell Creek, its water dropping at 3,600 gallons per second as it follows a course carved by fractures in granite. Millions of years

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Wikipedia Description
About Bighorn Scenic Byway:
Bighorn National Forest is located in northern Wyoming, United States and consists of over 1.1 million acres. Created as a US Forest Reserve in 1897, it is one of the oldest government-protected forest lands in the U.S. The forest is well east of the continental divide and extends from the Montana border for a distance of 80 miles (130 km) along the spine of the Big Horn Mountains, an outlying mountain range separated from the rest of the Rocky Mountains by Bighorn Basin. Elevations range from 5,000 feet (1,500 m) along the sagebrush and grass-covered lowlands at the foot of the mountains, to 13,189 feet (4,020 m) on top of Cloud Peak, the highest point in the Big Horn Mountains. The forest is named after the Bighorn River, which is partially fed by streams found in the forest. While the river and forest used the name "Bighorn" all in one word, the mountains associated with the forest are referred to as the "Big Horns". Within the forest is the Cloud Peak Wilderness area in which no
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