Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, California

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About Cuyamaca Rancho State Park:

The beautiful park offers camping and hiking in an oak woodland forest, with a sprinkling of pines and lovely meadows with creeks.  There are over 100 miles of trails which accommodate hikers, bikers, and equestrians.  The two family camps, Paso Picacho and Green Valley, are open and on the reservation system spring through fall.Green Valley sits at an elevation of 4,000 feet and has a creek which runs through the middle of the campground.The day use area offers sets of cascades and shallow pools, great for water play on hot days.Green Valley has 81 campsites.

Paso Picacho, 5 miles north, sits at an elevation of 5,000 feet.The most popular hikes start from this camp, including the 2 mile hike up Stonewall Peak (elevation 5,700 feet), and the 3.5 mile hike up Cuyamaca Peak (elevation 6,512 feet), both which offer breathtaking views of the deserts to the east, the coast to the west, and Lake Cuyamaca at the bottom.Lake Cuyamaca, operated by the Helix Water District, is two miles north of Paso Picacho and offers boating and fishing.  Paso Picacho campground has 85 campsites.

Each campsite has a picnic table and a fire ring.Restrooms with flush toilets and pay showers are in the campground. Wate

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Wikipedia Description
About Cuyamaca Rancho State Park:
Cuyamaca (Diegueno: 'Ekwiiyemak) is a region of eastern San Diego County. It lies east of the Capitan-Grande Indian Reservation in the western Laguna Mountains, north of Descanso and south of Julian. Originally a Mexican land grant, the region is now dominated by the 26,000 acres (105.2 km2) Cuyamaca Rancho State Park. Within the park is the prominent Cuyamaca Peak, the second-highest mountain in San Diego County at 6,512 feet (1,984.9 m). In 1889 Cuyamaca Dam was completed, creating Cuyamaca Reservoir. A wooden flume, now long gone, was constructed to carry water west toward San Diego. Before the Cedar Fire of 2003 the community of Cuyamaca consisted of approximately 145 homes on a mountain (North Peak) north of the reservoir. The name is a Spanish corruption of the Kumeyaay phrase "'Ekwiiyemak", which approximately means "the place where it rains", a reference to the region's higher average precipitation than San Diego County's low coastal areas. Cuyamaca is a popular toponym (pla
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